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Author Topic: What's the point of object writing?  (Read 5264 times)
frodo
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« on: March 28, 2015, 03:33:22 PM »

I've recently started object writing and some interesting things have come out of it: phrases, curious metaphors, etc. But once I've done my object writing task for the day, what then? What is the point of object writing? Do I then use this technique with a topic related to a song I'm trying to write? I have the whole of the day before me having completed by timed assignment but I don't know what to take from the object writing session! I stop writing when the timer goes and my notebook is filling up with exercises. I have no idea what to do with them!
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frodo
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2015, 12:34:34 PM »

Anyone?
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StephF124
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2015, 02:49:12 PM »

I would have to say that I've felt that way too at first. But there's a few benefits that I've found. First, it helps you to become more attentive to what's going on around you during the day. You see things you wouldn't have noticed before or pay attention to how people say things. Secondly, it gives you a well of resources to pull ideas from. For example, one of my objectives led me to a metaphor about a bed being a best friend. Later I used that as an idea starter for a song I wrote. I've also pulled out one liner gems that I file away separately to use in songs when I get stuck. Objective writing also helps you push past what you know and explore ideas you wouldn't have otherwise. And another unexpected side effect is I've noticed I've started dreaming more so I know it's activating something deeper in my subconscious.
You may want to change it up and try other writing exercises to switch it up if you're getting bored or do shorter times and see what comes up.
Hope this helps! I'm pretty new to it too so if some veterans want to chime in, I'd love to hear what long-term use has done.  Smiley
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Paul
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« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2015, 02:39:52 PM »

As Steph says, it's about turning on your sense sensors and being tuned in, as you walk around ask yourself at whatever moment you find yourself- in a Shopping mall, in a forest walk or by the bay; what am I ; hearing smelling, tasting, touching seeing?

When you have an idea for a song, do object writing around your subject, if you have kept your muscle tuned in then your should be able to 'go there' quickly. For example what if you felt your relationship was drowning because you were seeing too much of each other, write about drowning, or the sea or a river and  then you can grab lines for that to maybe use in your song, or use it as a launching point for metaphors. Anread Stolpe [student of Pat's] discusses using object writing to find lines for songs in what she calls destination writing...

http://songwritingtips.net/?p=50
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frodo
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2015, 09:19:44 AM »

Steph and Paul, thank you so much for your excellent responses. I've been reading 'Songwriting without Boundaries' and, by and large, I've done the exercises consecutively on a daily basis. I've noticed that the quality of my writing is improving. In other words, there are more potentially useable phrases now than at first. I was also prompted one day to write about rain falling, outside the book, because I had an image come to mind of rain being like metal slivers being drawn down by a magnet to the soil. I don't usually get stuff like that come to mind!

I'm really not so good with metaphors, so I'm looking forward to getting to the metaphor section of the book. Hopefully it can help me to write pretty yet unintelligible lyrics a la Coldplay!

Best wishes,
Chris
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dccavi
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2015, 04:15:15 PM »

Hi! This thread's full of good stuff, but I thought I'd give my two cents, as Object Writing's been a part of my daily routine for almost three years now, and I have nothing but good things to say about it.

When I was first starting out with object writing, ten minutes a day felt like forever. I found it difficult to do every day, and even when I was writing consistently every morning, it seemed like like any improvements I was making were microscopic, but I did notice them happening, and, with some willpower, got through my first year of OW. The turning point, for me, was when I picked up Writing Better Lyricsby Pat Pattison. Not only did the prompts and tips provided in the book help me to focus on the exercises at hand, but the exercises themselves helped me to explore new nooks and crannies of my subconscious that I had never been to before. In the course of my run through, I wrote a few songs that I would consider to be some of my best, and am actually working through the book again. 

Another important lesson that WBL taught me was that there is more than one way to do object writing. Bored of just writing for ten minutes? Try writing in verse, maybe even to a specific rhyme scheme! I do this every so often and hold onto the good stuff that comes out of it, as those are potential pieces of songs that can be called upon later. Of course, one should hold onto their regular object writes, too, but it makes things easier when your ideas are already organized into verses  Wink

Also, as a result of object writing, I've noticed a couple of small, subtle differences in the way my brain works. For one, I seem to be able to connect ideas in ways that I was unable or would have never thought to before; it's like my brain is doing little object writes throughout the day as I observe the world around me. Because of this, the speed and clarity with which I write seems to have improved drastically, as has the flow of ideas when brainstorming for and developing potential songs. Also, like StephF124, I've started dreaming more, which has offered great imagery to be recorded and used.

One last thing that doesn't really have to do with object writing: If anyone struggles to focus on their ideas for an extended period of time, I recommend adding puzzles and mind games to your daily routine. Sudoku has really helped me to stay on task and streamline my thinking. When I have time, I like to do an easy one before my object writing to warm my brain up a little bit.

Sorry for the novel (I tried to restrain myself Tongue), but like I said, I have nothing but good things to say about object writing/the work of Pat Pattison.

Thanks!
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